World Women's Championship: Selected Games of Round 3 Annotated by GM Deviatkin

Время публикации: 26.03.2015 19:10 | Последнее обновление: 26.03.2015 21:53

The 3rd round of the Women's World Championship taking place in Russia has been rich with interesting classical games. Some of them were annotated for our website by GM Andrey Deviatkin.

CRAMLING - GUNINA (round 3, game 1)
The Slav Defence
1.Nf3 d5 2.d4 Nf6 3.c4 c6. The Slav is the Russian champion's main weapon as Black, although in round 2 she successfully tried the Queen's Indian in the 2nd game against Olga Girya. In fact, she even admitted in the brief commentary for the Russian version of our website that she had spent a year preparing that opening. Maybe the problem this time was the order of moves chosen by the Swedish GM?
4.Nc3 dxc4 5.a4 Bf5 6.e3 e6 7.Bxc4 Bb4 8.O-O O-O 9.Nh4 Nbd7 10.h3.

10..a5?! Although it's well-known theory, the move might actually be dubious. The alternatives are 10...Bg6 (Kramnik - Le Quang Liem, Dortmund 2010), and 10...Rc8, preparing c6-c5. If 11.Nxf5 exf5 12.Qf3 g6 13.g4 then 13...c5 (Yevseev - Lastin, Russia 1999).
11.Nxf5 exf5 12.Qf3 Nb6 13.Bb3 g6 14.g4! This pawn advance serves the purposes of releasing the c1-bishop and fighting for the center, while the apparent weakness of the White king isn't easy to use. So far, no one has demonstrated a clear way to equality after 14.g4.
14...fxg4. In Kharlov - Deviatkin, Aeroflot 2004, Black tried to find the drawbacks of White's choice by two successive sacrifices: 14... Nbd5!? 15.Nxd5?! cxd5 16.gxf5 Kh8 17.Bc2 Qe7 18.Qf4 Bd6 19.Qg5 Rg8! 20.fxg6 Rxg6 21.Bxg6 Rg8 22.Kh1 Rxg6 23.Qh4 Qe6 with sufficient counterplay (the game ended in a draw). However, 15.gxf5 Nxc3 16.bxc3 Bxc3 17.Ra2 would have left Black's problems unsolved.
15.hxg4 Qe7?! Surprisingly, this natural move might be already losing! In the initial game on this topic, Alexander Beliavsky played 15...h5 16.gxh5 Nxh5 and even won against Rafael Vaganian (Reggio Emilia 1987), but Stockfish calmly points out that White had just mishandled the position: after 17.e4! the evaluation is over +1 for White.
16.e4! V
ery simple; it turns out that 16...Bxc3 is not a real threat, but it's hard to suggest anything instead.
16...Bxc3 (16...Nfd7 17.Bh6 Rfe8 18.e5 is too menacing) 17.bxc3 Nxe4 18.Re1 Rae8.

19.Bh6! Avoiding one of usual Gunina's traps: 19.Ba3? Nd2! (or 19...Ng5!), and Black is fine. Now White just gets an extra exchange (19...Ng5 20.Bxg5 winning), and the rest is a matter of technique. Pia Cramling got the deserved victory on move 39. 1-0

GALLIAMOVA - KONERU (round 3, game 2)

After the loss in the first game, Alisa Galliamova needed to win, but Koneru left her no chance, as she started to fight for initiative herself immediately after the opening:
17...b5! This is not a positional sacrifice: if 18 cxb5 then 18...Bxh2+! 19.Kxh2 Rxc2 20.Bxc2 Qc7+ with big advantage.
18.c5 Nd5 19.Nf3? Too submissive. The best was 19.g3 Bxd2 20.Rxd2, although I would prefer Black's position anyway. The tactical point of Koneru's idea was 19.Bxb5 Bxh2+! 20.Kxh2 Qh4+ 21.Kg1 Nf4 22.Qe3 Bxg2 23.f3, and now the best is 23...e5!! The alternatives are not as convincing:
23...Bxf1? 24.Nxf1 is simply in White's favour;
23...Qg3 24.Qxf4 Qxf4 25 Kxg2 is better for Black but not entirely clear yet;
23...Qh1+ 24.Kf2 Bxf1 25.Bxf1 Qh4+ 26.Kg1 Qg3+ 27.Kh1 also seems to be unsufficient for victory.
After 23...e5!, the key line runs: 24.dxe5 [if 24.d5 then 24...Qg3 25.Qxf4 Qxf4 26.Kxg2 Qg5+ 27.Kf2 (27.Kh2 Qh5+ 28.Kg1 Qg6+) 27...Rxc5!, etc.] 24...Qh1+ 25.Kf2 Bxf1 26.Bxf1 (26.Nxf1 Qg2+ 27.Ke1 Qxc2) 26...Qh4+ 27.Kg1 Qg3+ 28.Kh1 Rc6, mating.
19...Nb4 (obtaining a pair of bishops) 20.Rc3 Nxd3 21.Qxd3 (21.Rxd3 might be slightly stronger) 21...b4. Black's positional superiority is beyond any doubts.
22.Rc2 e5! 23.d5 Qxd5 24.Qxd5 Bxd5 25.Bxe5 Bxe5 26. Nxe5 f6.

27.Rd2?! The most tenacious way is 27.Nf3 Be4 28.Rb2 a5 29.Nd4. 27...Be6 28.Nd3 Rd8 29.Rfd1 a5 30.f3 Bf5 31.Kf2 Rxd3 32.Rxd3 Bxd3 33.Rxd3 Rxc5. Black has a good version of an extra pawn in a rook endgame, which Koneru managed, even though not without inaccuracies, to convert into her sixth win in succession. 0-1 on move 53.

Two more games of round 3 (Zhao Xue - Khotenashvili, Sebag - Pogonina), as well as final parts of the encounters analysed above, can be found with my annotations in the viewer below.

World Women's Championship: all the information

[Event "WCh Women 2015"] [Site "Sochi RUS"] [Date "2015.03.23"] [Round "3.6"] [White "Cramling, Pia"] [Black "Gunina, Valentina"] [Result "1-0"] [ECO "D19"] [WhiteElo "2495"] [BlackElo "2528"] [Annotator "1"] [PlyCount "77"] [EventDate "2015.03.17"] 1. Nf3 d5 2. d4 Nf6 3. c4 c6 4. Nc3 dxc4 5. a4 Bf5 6. e3 e6 7. Bxc4 Bb4 8. O-O O-O 9. Nh4 Nbd7 10. h3 a5 $6 { A theoretical move, which might be dubious at the same time.} ({ The alternatives are} 10... Bg6 {(Kramnik - Le Quang Liem, Dortmund 2010)}) ({ and} 10... Rc8 {, preparing c6-c5. If} 11. Nxf5 exf5 12. Qf3 g6 13. g4 {then} c5 {(Yevseev - Lastin, Russia 1999)}) 11. Nxf5 exf5 12. Qf3 Nb6 13. Bb3 g6 14. g4 $1 {The move serves the purposed of both releasing the c1-bishop and fighting for the center, while the seeming weakness of the White king is difficult to use. So far, no one has demonstrated a clear way to equalize after 14.g4.} fxg4 ({In Kharlov - Deviatkin, Aeroflot 2004, Black tried to underline the drawbacks of White's choice by the sacrifice:} 14... Nbd5 $5 15. Nxd5 $6 (15. gxf5 Nxc3 16. bxc3 Bxc3 17. Ra2) 15... cxd5 16. gxf5 Kh8 17. Bc2 Qe7 18. Qf4 Bd6 19. Qg5 Rg8 $1 20. fxg6 Rxg6 21. Bxg6 Rg8 22. Kh1 Rxg6 23. Qh4 Qe6 {with the sufficient counterplay (...1/2-1/2). However, 15.gxf5 Nxc3 16. bxc3 Bxc3 17.Ra2 would have left Black's problems unsolved.}) 15. hxg4 Qe7 $6 { Surprisingly, this might be already losing.} ({ In the very first game on this topic, Alexander Beliavsky played} 15... h5 $5 16. gxh5 Nxh5 {and even won against Vaganian (Reggio Emilia 1987), but the engine calmly points out that White had just mishandled the position - after 17.e4! the evaluation is over +1 in White's favour.} 17. e4 $1 (17. Rd1 Kg7 18. Ne4 Qe7 19. Bd2 Bxd2 20. Rxd2 Rae8 21. Nc5 Nf6 22. Kf1 Nbd5 23. Rdd1 Rh8 24. Bxd5 Nxd5 25. e4 Nb4 26. e5 Rh4 27. Nxb7 Nd5 28. Nd6 Reh8 29. Ke2 Rd8 30. Kf1 Nf4 31. Ra3 Qg5 32. Ne4 Qxe5 33. Ng3 Qe6 34. Rc3 Re8 35. Qxc6 Qh3+ 36. Kg1 Qg4 37. Qf3 Ne2+ 38. Kf1 Nxg3+ { 0-1 Vaganian,R (2595)-Beliavsky,A (2630)/Reggio Emilia 1987/CBM 005}) 17... Qxd4 $6 18. Be3 Qd8 19. Rad1 Qc7 20. Kh1 $1 {+1.66 Stockfish}) 16. e4 { Very simple. It turns out that 16...Bxc3 is not a real threat, but it's hard to suggest anything instead.} Bxc3 (16... Nfd7 17. Bh6 Rfe8 18. e5 { looks menacing}) 17. bxc3 Nxe4 18. Re1 Rae8 19. Bh6 $1 (19. Ba3 $2 Nd2 { (or 19...Ng5) would have been one of Gunina's usual traps. Now White just gets an extra exchange, and the rest is a matter of technique.}) 19... Nd5 20. c4 Ndc3 21. c5 Nd5 22. Bxf8 Kxf8 23. Bxd5 cxd5 24. Qf4 Qh4 25. Kg2 h5 26. Rh1 Qd8 27. Rab1 Qd7 28. Rb6 Kg8 29. Rhb1 Qxa4 30. Rxb7 Rf8 31. Qe5 Qc2 32. R7b2 Qd3 33. Rb8 f6 34. Qxd5+ Kg7 35. R1b7+ Kh6 36. Rxf8 f5 37. gxf5 Ng3 38. Rh7+ Kg5 39. fxg6+ 1-0 [Event "WCh Women 2015"] [Site "Sochi RUS"] [Date "2015.03.23"] [Round "3.7"] [White "Zhao, Xue"] [Black "Khotenashvili, Bela"] [Result "1-0"] [ECO "D37"] [WhiteElo "2527"] [BlackElo "2513"] [Annotator "1"] [PlyCount "93"] [EventDate "2015.03.17"] 1. d4 d5 2. c4 e6 3. Nc3 Be7 4. Nf3 Nf6 5. Bf4 O-O 6. e3 Nbd7 7. Qc2 c5 8. Rd1 cxd4 9. exd4 dxc4 10. Bxc4 Nb6 11. Bb3 Nbd5 12. Be5 h6 13. O-O b6 14. Bxf6 Bxf6 15. Nxd5 exd5 16. Ne5 Qd6 17. Rfe1 Be6 18. Qd3 Bxe5 19. Rxe5 Rfe8 20. Ba4 $6 ( 20. Bc2) 20... Bd7 $2 ({In case of normal play, Black is permanently worse, so she should have looked for extraordinary measures:} 20... f6 $1 21. Ree1 (21. Re3 Bd7 22. Bc2 Rxe3) 21... Bd7 22. Bc2 Rxe1+ 23. Rxe1 Re8 { with only slight advantage for White, since 24.Qh7+ Kf8 isn't dangerous.}) 21. Bc2 g6 ({The point is that} 21... f6 {now doesn't work due to} 22. Rxd5 $1) 22. Qe3 Rxe5 (22... Kg7 23. Bb3 Bc6 ( 23... f6 $5 24. Rxd5 Qxd5 25. Bxd5 Rxe3 26. fxe3 Rc8 27. Rd2 f5 $16) 24. Re1 { is also unpleasant}) 23. dxe5 Qe6 24. h3 {White starts to increase the pressure by slow maneuvering, thinking of attack at some point. Maybe Black still can save the game by precise defence, which the Georgian failed to demonstrate.} Rc8 25. Bb3 Rc5 26. Qd4 Bc6 27. a3 a5 28. Ba2 a4 29. Kh2 Qf5 30. Bb1 Qe6 31. Re1 Bb5 32. Qd2 Kg7 33. f4 $1 Rc4 34. Qf2 Bd7 35. Bd3 Rc5 36. Qg3 Kf8 37. Qh4 Kg7 38. Re3 d4 $6 {Missing the final combination.} (38... Rc8 $1 { still keeps Black half-alive.}) 39. f5 $1 gxf5 40. Qxd4 $2 {An inaccuracy.} ( 40. Rg3+ $1 {would have been same as in the game:} Kh7 (40... Kf8 41. Bxf5 $1 Qxf5 42. Qd8+ Be8 43. Qd6#) 41. Qg4 Qg6 42. Qxd4 Qe6 43. Bxf5+ Qxf5 44. e6) 40... Rd5 (40... Qd5 $1 41. Qh4 Rc6 42. Rg3+ Rg6 43. Qf6+ Kh7 44. Bxf5 Bxf5 45. Qxf5 Qe6 $16) 41. Qf4 Rc5 42. Rg3+ Kh7 43. Qg4 $1 {The beginning of the end.} Qg6 44. Qd4 Qe6 45. Bxf5+ $1 Qxf5 46. e6 Qe5 47. Qd3+ { , and Black resigned in view of 47...Qf5 48.exd7.} 1-0 [Event "WCh Women 2015"] [Site "Sochi RUS"] [Date "2015.03.23"] [Round "3.2"] [White "Sebag, Marie"] [Black "Pogonina, Natalija"] [Result "1-0"] [ECO "C65"] [WhiteElo "2482"] [BlackElo "2456"] [Annotator "Andrey Deviatkin"] [PlyCount "177"] [EventDate "2015.03.17"] 1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 Nf6 4. d3 Bc5 5. O-O Nd4 6. Nxd4 Bxd4 7. c3 Bb6 8. Na3 c6 9. Ba4 O-O 10. Bg5 h6 11. Bh4 Bc7 12. Bc2 b5 13. d4 d6 14. Bd3 g5 15. Bg3 Qe7 16. Re1 Bb6 17. Nc2 Bd7 18. h3 Rfd8 19. Qf3 Ne8 20. Rad1 Ng7 21. Bf1 Bc7 22. c4 a6 23. Ne3 Re8 24. b4 Rad8 25. d5 Rf8 26. dxc6 Bxc6 27. cxb5 axb5 28. Bxb5 $1 Ba8 29. Bc4 Bb6 30. Ng4 Kh7 31. Nf6+ Kg6 32. Nd5 Bxd5 33. Rxd5 Ne6 34. Qf5+ Kg7 35. h4 $2 {Up to this oversight, White was playing really well.} ( {Now White has to win the game from the very beginning, since her g3-bishop is locked.} 35. Rxd6 $1 { would have saved Sebag a lot of energy so necessary during the tiebreak...}) 35... Nd4 36. Qg4 Rc8 37. Bd3 Rc3 38. Rd1 Ra8 39. Bb1 Rc4 40. Kh2 Rxb4 41. f4 exf4 42. Bxf4 Qe6 43. Qxe6 fxe6 44. Bxd6 exd5 45. Bxb4 dxe4 46. Bc3 Ra4 47. Bxe4 gxh4 48. Rb1 Bc7+ 49. Kh3 Be5 50. Bd5 Kf6 51. Rb4 Ra3 52. Bb3 Nxb3 53. Bxe5+ Kxe5 54. axb3 Ra2 55. Rxh4 Rb2 56. Rb4 Kf5 57. g4+ Kg6 58. Kg3 Rb1 59. Kf4 Rf1+ 60. Ke5 Rb1 61. Kf4 Rf1+ 62. Kg3 Rg1+ 63. Kf3 Rf1+ 64. Kg2 Rd1 65. Rb5 Rd3 66. b4 Rb3 67. Kf2 Kf6 68. Rf5+ Kg6 69. b5 Kg7 70. Rc5 Kg6 71. Rd5 Kf6 72. Rc5 Kg6 73. Ke2 Kf6 74. Rf5+ Kg6 75. Kd2 Rb4 76. Kc3 Rxg4 77. Rc5 Rg1 78. Kb4 Rb1+ 79. Ka5 Ra1+ $2 ({Pogonina either got scared by shadows or was exhausted by long defence.} 79... h5 80. b6 h4 81. Ka6 ({or} 81. Rb5 Rxb5+ 82. Kxb5 h3) 81... h3 {is elementary}) 80. Kb6 h5 81. Kc7 h4 $2 ( 81... Ra5 $1 {is the only way to draw}) 82. b6 h3 {Now it's all over.} (82... Rb1 83. b7 h3 84. b8=Q Rxb8 85. Kxb8 h2 86. Rc1 $18) 83. b7 h2 84. b8=Q h1=Q 85. Qg8+ Kh6 86. Rc6+ Kh5 87. Qg6+ Kh4 88. Rc4+ Kh3 89. Qg4+ 1-0 [Event "WCh Women 2015"] [Site "Sochi RUS"] [Date "2015.03.24"] [Round "3.1"] [White "Galliamova, Alisa"] [Black "Koneru, Humpy"] [Result "0-1"] [ECO "A15"] [WhiteElo "2484"] [BlackElo "2581"] [Annotator "2"] [PlyCount "106"] [EventDate "2015.03.17"] 1. Nf3 Nf6 2. c4 e6 3. e3 b6 4. b3 Bb7 5. Bb2 d5 6. d4 Be7 7. Bd3 O-O 8. O-O c5 9. Nbd2 Nbd7 10. Qe2 Rc8 11. Rac1 Rc7 12. Ne5 cxd4 13. exd4 dxc4 14. bxc4 Nxe5 15. Qxe5 Bd6 16. Qe2 Bf4 17. Rc2 b5 $1 18. c5 ({ This is not a positional sacrifice: if} 18. cxb5 { then Black regains the pawn by} Bxh2+ $1 19. Kxh2 Rxc2 20. Bxc2 Qc7+ { with big advantage}) 18... Nd5 19. Nf3 $2 {Too submissive. The best was 19.g3 Bxd2 20.Rxd2, although Black's position looks preferrable anyway.} (19. g3 Bxd2 (19... Bg5 20. Bxb5) 20. Rxd2 b4) ({The tactical point of Koneru's idea was} 19. Bxb5 Bxh2+ $1 20. Kxh2 Qh4+ 21. Kg1 Nf4 22. Qe3 Bxg2 23. f3 { , and now the best is} e5 $1 {The key line runs:} (23... Bxf1 $2 24. Nxf1 { is in White's favour}) (23... Qg3 24. Qxf4 $1 Qxf4 25. Kxg2 { is better for Black but not entirely clear}) (23... Qh1+ 24. Kf2 Bxf1 25. Bxf1 Qh4+ 26. Kg1 Qg3+ 27. Kh1 {can hardly bring Black more than equality}) 24. dxe5 ({or} 24. d5 Qg3 25. Qxf4 Qxf4 (25... exf4 $2 26. Ne4) 26. Kxg2 Qg5+ 27. Kf2 ( 27. Kh2 Qh5+ 28. Kg1 Qg6+) 27... Rxc5 $1 {, etc.}) 24... Qh1+ 25. Kf2 Bxf1 26. Bxf1 (26. Nxf1 Qg2+ 27. Ke1 Qxc2) 26... Qh4+ 27. Kg1 Qg3+ 28. Kh1 Rc6 {, mating }) 19... Nb4 20. Rc3 Nxd3 21. Qxd3 (21. Rxd3 { might be the slightly better alternative}) 21... b4 { (Black's positional advantage is beyond doubts)} 22. Rc2 e5 $1 23. d5 Qxd5 24. Qxd5 Bxd5 25. Bxe5 Bxe5 26. Nxe5 f6 27. Rd2 $6 ({The most tenacious is} 27. Nf3 Be4 (27... Rfc8 28. Rfc1 a5 29. Nd4 Be4) 28. Rb2 Rb8 29. Rc1) 27... Be6 28. Nd3 Rd8 29. Rfd1 a5 30. f3 Bf5 31. Kf2 Rxd3 32. Rxd3 Bxd3 33. Rxd3 Rxc5 {Black has a healthy extra pawn in a rook endgame, which she managed to realise, even though not without some inaccuracies.} 34. a3 bxa3 35. Rxa3 Kf7 36. Ke3 Ke6 37. Rb3 Kd6 38. Rb8 Rc2 39. g4 Kc7 $6 (39... Rc3+ 40. Ke2 a4 41. Rg8 a3 42. Rxg7 Rc7) 40. Rg8 g6 41. h4 $6 (41. Rg7+ Kb6 42. Rxh7 a4 43. Rh8 { is better, although Black is probably still winning:} Rc7 $1 44. Ra8 Ra7 45. Rb8+ (45. Rxa7 Kxa7 46. Kd4 g5 $1) 45... Kc7 46. Rb1 g5 {, etc.}) 41... Kb7 42. Rf8 a4 43. Rxf6 a3 44. Rd6 a2 45. Rd1 Rc4 46. Ra1 Ra4 47. f4 Kc6 48. Kf3 Kd5 49. g5 Kc4 50. f5 gxf5 51. Kf4 Kb3+ 52. Kxf5 Rxh4 53. Rg1 Ra4 0-1 


  


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